Facebook Icon Youtube Icon
Facebook Icon Youtube Icon
Facebook Icon Youtube Icon

Erectile Dysfunction Predicts Heart Attack and Stroke!

Erectile Dysfunction: What, How and Why To Treat It.

The inability to achieve and maintain an erection sufficient for satisfactory sexual performance can substantially interfere with erotic pleasure and sexual intimacy. Recent evidence, however, reveals that it can be much more serious than the ability to attain an awesome erection – more on that in a minute.

Erectile dysfunction afflicts at least 12 million men in the United States, making it a very common disorder and even though erectile dysfunction occurs more commonly in older men, it can raise its ugly head – no pun intended – as early as the late 30s and early 40s.

Conditions commonly associated with erectile dysfunction include: cardiovascular disease, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, high blood pressure, obesity, smoking, sedentary lifestyles, prostate cancer treatment and endocrine disturbances like low testosterone.

Psychological issues also play a role and individuals with sexual guilt, anxiety, depression, a history for sexual abuse, high life stress and relationship dysfunction are more likely to suffer from erectile dysfunction.

Many substances – prescribed or not – contribute to ED

Alcohol, nicotine, amphetamines, cocaine, marijuana and opioids interfere with erectile function. The lists of prescribed medications that interfere with erectile function are many and include antidepressants, antihistamines, blood pressure medications, diuretics, benzodiazepines and opioids.

As you can plainly see, ED is complex and multifactorial. And for many doctors and most patients it’s easy to give into, “Can’t you just prescribe me the little blue pill? It’s Friday night, doc. I might get lucky!”

As it turns out there’s much more to it, and erectile dysfunction is much more serious than previously understood. So here’s the most important take-home message in this post.

Research confirms that erectile dysfunction is associated with an increased incidence of heart attack, stroke and all-cause-mortality. In fact, according to Rew, “ED typically occurs 2 to 5 years before coronary artery disease providing a potential window during which men diagnosed with erectile dysfunction can make lifestyle changes to prevent it.” You heard me, ED typically occurs 2 to 5 years before coronary artery disease providing potential window during which men diagnosed with erectile dysfunction can make lifestyle changes to prevent it. Moreover, “Men with erectile dysfunction are at higher risk for angina, heart attack, stroke, transient ischemic attack, congestive heart failure and cardiac arrhythmias compared with men who do not have ED.” Furthermore, men who develop ED in their 40’s are even more likely to acquire cardiovascular disease than men who develop erectile dysfunction at an older age.

So get serious. Talk to your partner. See your family doctor. Make a plan. Improve your lifestyle. Get your health conditions under control. Modify offending medications. Eliminate drugs. Moderate alcohol. Maintain a dialogue with your partner. Live longer. Have great sex!

This is Dr. Jim for Be Healthy! Be Happy! hoping this message powers your path to happiness!

Reference:

Rew, K., 2016. Erectile Dysfunction, American Family Physician, November 2016. Online {Available at]: http://www.aafp.org/afp/2016/1115/p820.html [Accessed: January 17, 2017].